Granite vs Quartz

    Granite vs Quartz

    This is a very popular question now and worth spending a couple minutes on. When deciding between the two there are many things to consider like budget, maintenance, color selections and durability to name a few.

    This is a very popular question now and worth spending a couple minutes on. When deciding between the two there are many things to consider like budget, maintenance, color selections and durability to name a few.

    The first and maybe the biggest difference in granite vs quartz is that granite is a 100% natural stone that is mined from the earth in large blocks, cut into slabs and polished. While quartz countertops are a mixture of 93% crushed quartz and 7% resin mixed together to form a variety of colors and patterns.

    When it comes to price, it’s hard to say that one is more expensive then the other in every situation but generally speaking Quartz is more expensive. There are variables that can have a major impact such as the price point of granite you select, the square footage of your countertop space, the edging you select and so on. Your best bet is to learn the benefits & drawbacks of each and then speak with a professional.

    Quartz:

    • Because it is a manufactured product, quartz is much more consistent in color & patterns. It is also non-porous which means it requires virtually no maintenance.
    • Quartz is very durable and also stain resistant. Spilled wine is no problem with just a quick cleanup.
    • Installation of quartz is slightly easier then granite because it has more flexibility. But hiring a pro for this is still the only way to go.
    • The seems on this material are generally easier to match up then granite because of the products consistency but will likely still be visible.
    • One drawback of quartz is it can fade over time from direct sunlight. Something to consider if part of your countertop gets considerably more light then another.

    Granite:

    • Since this is a natural stone there are bound to be unique characteristics to every slab. Veining, color patterns, swirls, etc…will never be consistent from slab to slab. Some will find this as a benefit while others may view this as a drawback.
    • Granite is porous but sealing them after installation and on a regular schedule after that will help prevent staining. Depending on use, some kitchens would benefit from yearly sealing while others could be safe every 3 years.
    • This stone is extremely durable but not indestructible. With proper care this countertop will stand the test of time.
    • Like quartz these countertops are very heavy and will require professional installation.
    • It is nearly impossible to hide the seems on granite because of the natural variations in slabs.
    • When selecting granite you really need to hit the showroom and select the slab you want. Looking at sample pieces may or may not be an accurate reflection of the slab you end up with.

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